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Native Plants at Arboretum (In Progress)

Project History

  • 4/3/2017

    Here is a Channel 3 news story of removing garlic mustard at the South Arboretum woods.   It left out mention of PRI, the University and SSC, but it does have two NRES students speaking. 

  • 6/30/2016

    The former forest research area south of the main Arboretum grounds (near Lincoln Avenue and Windsor Road) has been neglected for over 20 years and has largely been overtaken by invasive plantings that have forced out the native flowering forbs an

Description

The University of Illinois Arboretum contains gardens, collections, and habitats that transform 160 acres of the south campus. Not only does the Arboretum serve as a beautiful area for the public to enjoy, but as a “living laboratory” for University students studying plants sciences and fine and applied arts.

The Dr. Frank W. Kari Walkway and Ponds Restoration Project was dedicated September 27, 2012. This addition, which includes a 1/3 mile-long walkway, benches, educational signage, and ponds, to the Arboretum included over 20,000 native plants. The native plants increase the Arboretum’s commitment to serve as a “living laboratory” at the University.

The University of Illinois Arboretum has historically showcased formal displays of annual ornamental plants and selected trees. There is increased interest in developing plots and displays of native plants, especially those that are beneficial to pollinators. This project will introduce a variety of such native plants into several settings at the Arboretum. The Arboretum intends to use the plantings as an outdoor laboratory that will be used for formal and informal education about the role of native plants in provision of ecosystem services such as pollination adn improving soil quality. The experience gained will lay the ground work for future expansion of the concept including large plantings within selected locations and patches of clearly labeled plants that will allow visitors to learn their names and characteristics.

The plantings will also provide physical examples of how small plantings can be used in personal and commercial landscapes. The use of perennial native plants will help the Arboretum assess the potential to save money and other resources by using more plants that do not have to be repurchased and replanted annually. The native plants along with improved habitat conditions will support a large number of local pollinators and other insect and bird species that are increasingly threatened by loss of habitat, and provide an instructional resource for university classes and local schools.

Project Team

  • Project Leader:

    Kevin McSweeney

Themes

Project Location(s)

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