You are here

Proposed

Surplus Catalog

One of the strategies set forth in the 2010 Illinois Climate Action Plan under Purchasing, Waste, and Recycling theme was to develop a durable goods reuse cataloguing system. Such a system would allow an simple and clear process for reuse of durable goods. Properly carried out, this would reduce purchasing and waste at the University.

State Laws for Non-Potable Water

According to the 2010 iCAP, non-potable sources of water will utilized when appropriate, including connecting the existing raw water system by 2020. Such sources of non-potable water include untreated raw water, sump pump discharge, cooling tower wastewater, stormwater, and greywater. Before utilizing such sources, the University must conduct research to understand how non-potable water may be used within the constraints of the Illinois state laws.

Option for Bikes in Buildings

The Facility Standards for campus do not permit bicycles to be brought into buildings.  This is due to the impact on maintenance required for interior spaces when bicycles are brought into hallways, stairwells, and individual rooms.  However, there is a need for sheltered bicycle parking during winter months. 

The F&S Pilot program will inform future efforts for indoor bike parking for buildings on campus. 

Interdisciplinary Research Seminar

One of the goals of the Illinois Climate Action Plan is to create a community of scholarship around the Plan. The iCAP suggests developing an interdisciplinary reasearch seminar for graduate students as one way in which this goal can be achieved. Those who take part in the seminar would be exposed to the plan as a whole and would contribute to its evolution and implementation through research.

Construct Tile-Drainage Wetlands

Construction of tile-drainage wetlands is a strategy the University would use to reduce carbon emissions. GHG emissions aren’t the only environmental contaminants on the South Farms. Extensive tile drainage on 3,609 acres of farmland delivers more than 100 metric tons of nitrate-N to the Embarras River and ultimately to the Gulf of Mexico, where it contributes to gulf hypoxia.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Proposed