You are here

Projects Updates for Green Roofs on Campus

Search tips:
  • This form will search for words in the title OR the description. If you would like to search for the same term(s) across both the title and description, enter the same search term(s) in both fields.
  • This form will search for any of the words you enter in a field, not the exact phrase you enter. If you would like to search for an exact phrase, put double quotes (") around the phrase. For example, if you search for Bike Path you will get results containing either the word Bike OR the word Path, but if you search for "Bike Path" you will get results containing the exact phrase Bike Path.
  1. SECS follow up meeting with F&S staff

    Gabriel Kosmacher, Shallon Malfeo, Betsy Liggett, Morgan White, and Brent Lewis met this morning to discuss the plans for adding a green roof at the Nick Holonyak Jr. Micro-Nano Technology Center.

    SECS is interested in developing the green roof on the closed patio for MNTL.  What structural load can the patio maintain?  Qu Kim had said the patio was closed off because they weren't comfortable with having people out there, and Brent thought it would be a really good idea to put a green roof there.

    SECS requested the floor plans to identify the square footage of the patio, and apply for SSC funding. Brent will provide the floor plans. SECS will work through who will maintain the green roof.

    Morgan asked if perhaps it could be a vegetable garden, which could provide food to users or donated to the Bucket Brigade. Shallon noted that the food could go to Solidarity Gardens. Morgan asked if Brent thinks vegetable gardening is even feasible in this location, and he explained that it would be way more maintenance. Betsy said it would need maintenance daily instead of monthly, if it were veggies. Additionally, the veggies would lead to more carrying green materials throughout the halls, which would not be well received by the users. This space should not include human food production.

    Step 1 -- talk to Ryan Wild and Qu Kim about whether this space is feasible. Then work on design plans and SSC funding application. Consider contacting Fine and Applied Arts about a long-term partnership. There will also need to be a Memo of Understanding about the maintenance of the green roof.

     

  2. SECS rep met with F&S staff about a green roof

    Alec Van Patten met with Brent Lewis, Betsy Liggett, and Morgan White to discuss the SECS' idea to get a new green roof on campus.  F&S staff shared some lessons learned from other green roof installations, and suggested some potential locations.  These include:

    • Newmark Civil Engineering Lab - first floor roof by the bridge
    • Nick Holonyak Micro & NanoTechnology Lab - closed picnic balcony on the north side
    • National Soybean Research Center - gravel roof by iSEE conference room
    • Turner Hall - the north entryway and offices
    • Future Arboretum Building - longer term and influential
    • The SECS team should review Google Maps and look at roofs they are interested in, if they want to consider other options.

    We also mentioned the ECE green wall, which needs help getting refurbished.  It most likely needs better watering and possibly needs a review of the soil quality.

    For the funding, the SECS is likely going to request SSC funding in the spring semester.  Brent says they can request pricing info from LiveRoof.com to get an estimated budget.

    Once a location is selected, Alec will email this group to move into the preliminary approval stage.

  3. Green Rooftop Proposal for Newmark Civil Engineering Lab

    Associated Project(s): 

    President of "Students for Environmental Concerns", Alec Van Patten, reached out to propose a green rooftop project for a building on campus. Morgan White replied suggesting the Newmark Civil Engineering Lab first floor roof as the building for the project. A meeting to discuss further details was scheduled between Morgan White, Alec Van Patten, Betry Liggett, and Brent Lewis.

    Picture of the Newmark Civil Engineering Lab roof is attached. 

    Attached Files: 
  4. Final project reports for Fall 2017

    The CEE 398 Project Based Learning and the Sustainability Minor's ENVS 492 Capstone students completed their nine fall 2017 reports.

    There were five projects completed for capstone partners:

    1. Energy Dashboards for Accenture
    2. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for Johnson Controls
    3. Food Hub Study for The Land Connection
    4. Sensors and Green Buildings for CERL
    5. Biomass Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) for Chip Energy

    There were four other projects completed by CEE students:

    1. Rain Garden Design
    2. Solar and Green Roofs Analysis
    3. Food Waste to Energy
    4. ADA Sidewalk Repair Cost Analysis
  5. Water & Stormwater Meeting Minutes 4/13/2017

    Discussion of upcoming joint meeting with Agriculture, Land Use, Food and Sequestration (ALUF) SWAT. Development of ideas for student projects, including georeferenced inventory for F&S, analysis of green roofs and solar panels, and phoshorus monitoring of stormwater. 

  6. Article about White Roofs vs. Green Roofs

    Associated Project(s): 

    White Roofs Better Than Dark, Vegetated Roofs, LBNL Study Finds
    BERKELEY, Calif.—Compared to traditional dark-colored roofs and green or “vegetated” roofs, white roofs offer greater ability to lower temperatures that lead to the urban heat island effect, and they do it at less cost, according to a recent report. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report states that building owners “concerned with global warming should choose white roofs, which are three times more effective than green roofs at cooling the globe.” The authors analyzed 22 commercial flat roof projects in the U.S. and performed a 50-year life-cycle cost analysis. They assumed a 20-year service life for black roofs and white roofs, and 40 years for green roofs. Compared to black roofs, the report says, white roofs save $25/m2 ($2.30/ft2) and green roofs have an additional cost of $71/m2 ($6.60/ft2). The authors also concluded that black roofs should be prohibited in some areas. “We strongly recommend building code policies that phase out dark-colored roofs in warm climates to protect against their adverse public health externalities,” the report states.

    Read more

    Excerpt:    However, unlike white roofs, green roofs do not offset climate change. White roofs are more reflective than green roofs, reflecting roughly three times more sunlight back into the atmosphere and therefore absorbing less sunlight at earth’s surface. By absorbing less sunlight than either green or black roofs, white roofs offset a portion of the warming effect from greenhouse gas emissions.

    “Both white and green roofs do a good job at cooling the building and cooling the air in the city, but white roofs are three times more effective at countering climate change than green roofs,” said Rosenfeld.

Subscribe to