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  1. Meeting 8 September

    The ALUFS SWATeam had its first meeting of the year, during which the scope of the teams' focus was reviewed. Because of the range of topics, the team decided to narrow down its focus for the year, particularly on the university's farm properties, nitrate sampling, and best management practices.

  2. Weekly Update

    All, last week was a blur! According to our sign-in data, we had 277 visitors. That seems high but numbers don’t lie. We were pretty much all-stands-full within the first half an hour. Unfortunately that means some members have had to wait for stands to work on their build-a-bikes. Nothing we can do about that, unfortunately.

    The numbers:
    Sales (overall): $1,867.60

    Bikes (refurbished): 1 for $180
    Bikes (B-a-B): 1 for $46
    Memberships: 26 for $780
    Tires/tubes: 47 for $244

    This week sees the beginning of the fix-a-flat class that Lily has shepherded into existence (Thanks, Lily!). I already have told people about that to much positive interest. There also is a community ride happening in the middle of the week that I will attend. I will also help with LTN preparations this week. A couple new student workers are starting this week, too, which will be good.

    • Jake Benjamin
      Campus Bike Center Manager
  3. A Model Program for Reducing Water Waste on Campus

    As collegians head back to campus this fall it means campus water use will spike, so ISTC has released a video on a model program which dramatically cut water waste with a student-directed behavior change campaign. Loyola University Chicago implemented its “Gallons Saved and Shared” project with the help of a grant from ISTC’s Billion Gallon Challenge. Student interns and volunteers planned and executed fixture upgrades across much of the campus and designed a awareness/behavioral campaign with the expertise of psychology majors. In addition, Robyn Mallett, associate professor of psychology and her colleagues, were able to study the responses to produce scientific insights. A college campus is an ideal setting to build a culture of sustainability that can follow graduates throughout their lives. The experience of “Gallons Saved and Shared” is a model that can be considered to produce conservation results on other campuses, said Aaron N. Durnbaugh, Loyola’s director of sustainability.

  4. Update on progress

    Gopal and Morgan reviewed the Big Ten schools in the Green Sports Alliance.  Gopal will find associated scores for the schools that are in that program.  He pulled data for the DIA buildings from the Energy Billing System, and put them into the consolidated format.  He also began reviewing the Green Sports Alliance programs.  During the next month, Gopal will contact the SWATeams to brainstorm potential ways DIA can help acheive the iCAP objectives for their topics.  He will also start a draft word document for the DIA CAP and list recommended actions for each chapter of the iCAP.

  5. Weekly Update

    Associated Project(s): 

    All, last week was—according to the visitor numbers—an unprecedentedly busy week. According to our tracker for visitors we had 239 people into the shop last week. I pored over the list of visitors and cut down two duplicate sign-ins from the original 241, but other than that the numbers bear out: we averaged about 50 sign-ins per day. Most must have been those looking for bikes and since we’re sold out, moved on quickly, because the shop never felt unbearably busy.

    Sales: Overall: $1,865.70; refurbished bikes: 3 for $440; B-a-Bs: 3 for $199; memberships: 17 for $510; tires/tubes: for 31 for $147.

    Yesterday was Quad Day. I think it went very well. We handed out bike registration flyers and successfully registered a few people’s bikes thanks to the iPad Lily brought. I will be interested to see how many people show up for registration stickers this week (hopefully a lot). Most people did not realize it was required to register your bike on campus.

    On Friday, Lily, Scott (from Parking), Officer Briggs from UIPD and I had a meeting to discuss theft and removal of abandoned bikes on campus. We will have a follow up meeting at a TBD date to discuss ways to streamline removal of abandoned bikes without advertising that fact to thieves and the like as well as how to better educate students about bike registration and locking technique.

    This week I will build bikes, have volunteers count and sort all the Light The Night light sets, and attend the TBP member meeting. I will brainstorm ways to expedite the registration sticker procurement process here at CBC, as last week we had a long line of people who didn’t understand (despite many announcements) that they could do the majority of the registration process on their phones beforehand.

    Sincerely,

    • Jake Benjamin
      Campus Bike Center Manager
  6. Archived info - previous program description, replaced August 20, 2017

    Associated Project(s): 

    [Did not preserve the previous version of the first paragraph, to which minor updates were made to indicate that boxes are for a mix of single-use and rechargeable batteries and that participating units must pay Call2Recycle.]

    Call2Recycle accepts all rechargeable batteries that weigh less than 11 pounds, including Nickel-Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) and Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/ Pb) batteries. Individual batteries must have their terminals taped or be bagged before being placed in the Call2Recycle  boxes. Leaking batteries are not accepted, and should be disposed of through the Division of Research Safety (217-333-2755).

    To start the program in your office:

    1.         Visit the Call2Recycle website at http://www.call2recycle.org/ and join the free rechargeable battery recycling program.  Call2Recycle will follow up with a return phone call to you. When you receive this call, please provide them with the University of Illinois’s Parent ID #78151.

    2.         Call2Recycle will send the collection boxes with UPS shipping labels directly to your building.  When you first start the program, please notify F&S Waste Management at 244-7283.

    3.         When a box is full of individually bagged rechargeable batteries, check to ensure that only acceptable batteries are in the box.

    4.         Write down the box’s UPS tracking number and then place the full box at a UPS pickup location. UPS will pick the box up free of charge at the time of their next scheduled delivery.  UPS will ship the full box of batteries to a metal reclamation center for processing.

    5.         Call2Recycle will automatically send you new empty boxes with UPS shipping labels.

  7. Archived info - previous program description, replaced Aug. 20, 2017

    Associated Project(s): 

    Single-use battery recycling can be done through an outside vendor, Battery Solutions. This vendor accepts single-use (AA, AAA, C, D, and 9V). Battery Solutions also accepts button cells and lithium primary batteries, but leaking lead acid batteries are not accepted and should be disposed of through the Division of Research Safety (217-333-2755). Batteries should be individually bagged or have their terminals tapped before being placed in the Battery Solutions container. Each 55-pound container of batteries is sent through FedEx. The cost for the each container to complete the process is $84. This program is no longer centrally funded.

    To initiate the program in your office:

    • Contact:  800-852-8127
    • URL:  http://www.batteryrecycling.com/
    • Cost:  $84 per 55-lb Pail (includes empty container, pre-paid FedEx shipping labels to return full container, and cost of recycling batteries)
    • Shipment Method: FedEx (building contacts can call FedEx directly to arrange pick-up, or go through vendor contact to have them do it.)
    • Notes: Battery Solutions automatically charges us and sends a new container when we return a full container to them
  8. Battery recycling participation instructions updated in iCAP; F&S page updates pending

    Instructions for units that want to provide battery recycling have been updated on the appropriate iCAP Portal pages, with a detail regarding the provision of a "parent ID number" to Call2Recycle still pending. Once that detail has been confirmed, iCAP Portal instructions will be updated again if necessary, and instructions on the F&S page will be updated.

  9. Purchasing analysis of paper and recycled-content underway

    Morgan Johnston and Hursh Hazari met to review the FY15 paper purchases by academic college.  Hursh is going to add some analysis about the costs associated with switching to a minimum of 30% recycled content paper.  He is also going to take the draft purchasing policy proposed to UA (attached here) and modify it to meet UIUC CAM standards.

  10. discussion to add solar PVs at Idea Garden Shed

    Associated Project(s): 

    The Idea Garden committee, with the UI Extension, continues discussions about adding rooftop solar to the Arboretum Garden Shed hear the Idea Garden.  Last year, Idea Garden representatives worked with Masters of Energy Systems students to consider potential design plans.  The final scope of the desired solar PV project is still to be determined. One likely option is to use solar to power the light in the shed, and use the existing campus electrical grid to provide other power needs, such as winter heating.

  11. Meetings with Building Experts

    Associated Project(s): 

    With the finalized format of the energy report card and the compiled major events documented in Facilities and Services’ records, Ms. Morgan Johnston, Ms. Barnes, and I scheduled meetings with facilities staff who have the most knowledge about how each building works. This week, we talked to Ms. Mylinda Granger, Ms. Pat Malik from Disabilities Resources and Educational Services; Mr. Greg Anderson from Temple Hoyne Buell Hall; and Ms. Carol Young, Ms. Kari Cooperider, and Mr. Steve Hess from the Business Instructional Facility. They shared important information and wanted to help share the report with building occupants.

     

    Next step is to revise the draft report cards based on these meetings. In the next few weeks, more meetings will be scheduled.

     

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